Permaculture and Food Forest Nursery - Howland, Maine
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Wine Grape Jelly

Wine Grape Jelly

See our selection of wine and table grapes.  All are suited for cold climates.  Surprise yourself.  Mix red, blue, black grapes with lighter colors and develop your own special jelly.  Wine grapes are delicious fresh.  When I was a kid, working at a fruit and produce company that catered to the European ethnic populations of Italy, Lithuania, and Poland, we sold wine grapes for wine-making.  I loved sneaking some and eating them fresh - delicious! It follows that if you want some special jelly, use wine grapes! You’ll need:wine grapessugarlemon juicesure-gel low sugar pectincheesecloth or a jelly baghalf pint jars...

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Black Locust Recipe - Black Locust Jelly

Black Locust Recipe - Black Locust Jelly

jiovi® Black Locust Tree seedlings- click  This jelly is made using the same method we have been using all spring to make flower and blossom jellies. We gather the Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) flower clusters right before or very shortly after they open for the sweetest and most fragrant results. The white flowers are removed from the green stems, and tightly packed into a measuring cup. Boiled water is poured over the flowers, and we allow them to steep overnight. I strain the flowers out through a jelly bag, and allow the liquid to settle. The pollen will sink to...

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Black Locust Recipe - Black Locust Custard

Black Locust Recipe - Black Locust Custard

jiovi® Black Locust Tree seedlings- click  This recipe is based on a Hungarian recipe using acacia flowers. Look at the Latin name for Black Locust--Robinia pseudoacacia. It means false acacia. The flowers appear very similar between the two trees--arranged in clusters, fragrant, and edible. Our Black Locusts only bloom for a few days in late spring, so we gather as much as we can. The flowers are so abundant that the trees appear white. The trees also like to invade an area, and you will find many fast-growing locusts grouped together. We finished the custard with a glaze of black locust jelly for shine...

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Wine Cap (Stropharia rugosoannulata) The easiest Mushroom to grow

Wine Cap (Stropharia rugosoannulata) The easiest Mushroom to grow

 *Upcoming Shipping Dates - February 15, March 6, March 27, April 7, May 8, 2017 Order Now to ensure availability click to browse products Wine Cap Stropharia rugosoannulata - Vigorous red-capped fruiting bodies thrive on woody debris piles and work well in non-sterile environments such as outdoor sawdust, wood chip and straw beds. Prefers hardwood chips but will grow on a mix of soft and hard. Once established, a wine cap bed will produce for several years and can be easily transplanted into fresh woody debris to create a new bed.  Can be incorporated into annual garden vegetable plantings...

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Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) A Friend to Global Warming and Whales?

Seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) A Friend to Global Warming and Whales?

CO₂ Generated in the Production and Distribution of Orange Juice Locally Produced Vitamin C from Seabuckthorn Growing Seabuckthorn has the added benefit of providing important human nutrients which are produced locally.  Vitamin C, as found in orange juice, need not be produced and shipped huge distances using fossil fuels.  On average, for every 100 people in the United States there are50 tons of carbon dioxide emissions produced per year as a result of drinking orange juice.   Doing some research and calculation, this means the local production of vitamin C from seaberries could prevent over 158 million tons of carbon dioxide...

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